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Achieving the best picture using Bettle PSX at 240p
#1
What do you think it's the better way to achieve the best picture on a standard CRT using Bettle PSX?

While using the Vulkan driver and the Bettle hardware render, I prefer to increase the internal resolution to 8x and use a horizontal resolution of 2560.  

Using the the software render, anything above 2x of internal resolution is too slow, so I prefer to use 640x240 with the internal resolution at 2x.

I'm still not sure if doing this kind of thing produces any scaling artifact. I hope not.

PSX games looks MUCH better with a higher horizontal resolution while maintaining 240p. Very sharp.

There is also a new option called Super Sampling (downsample from internal upscale) that makes the graphics looks very smooth, but too blurry for my taste. 
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#2
Ok. So, most of the options have been added for LCDs.

As long as the resolution is a multiple, then you will net get any artifacts how ever is you are locked at 192,2560 or 3840 there is a higher chance of artifacting, this is because some resolutions will not be exact multiples of this super resolution. This is where the new DYNAMIC resolution option comes in. It will always make sure that the resolution is an exact multiple but give you that extra width like super width.

What hardware and OS are you running, have you tried the DYNAMIC option yet?
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#3
(02-17-2019, 03:45 PM)alphanu Wrote: What hardware and OS are you running, have you tried the DYNAMIC option yet?

I'm using my main computer, with Windows 10 and two different GPUs: Radeon 5450 and a Nvdia GTX 1080.

For 240p gaming I'm using the Radeon, and since I'm using two different displays I need to make my CRT the primary monitor when I want to use Retroarch.

I'm trying to learn more about MME4CRT before using it. Right now I'm just using native resolutions manually, but sometimes not exactly native.

When playing SNES games, for example, I prefer to use 296x240 (or 304x240) instead of 256x240 because I think SNES games looks nicer with square pixels. The native SNES resolution (256x240) looks too stretched for my taste. Same thing for GBA and others systems with a horizontal resolution lower than 320.

So, I need to pick resolutions manually because some are not exactly native. I guess MME4CRT would not help me with that, unfortunately. 

I'm still not sure how Dynamic would work, to be honest. If I'm playing, for example, a game with a native resolution of 384x224 - the calculator says the dynamic resolution will be 1152. Do I need to have to have a modeline of exactly 1152x240 installed on the video card drivers before using it?
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#4
(02-18-2019, 02:56 AM)tisurame Wrote:
(02-17-2019, 03:45 PM)alphanu Wrote: What hardware and OS are you running, have you tried the DYNAMIC option yet?

I'm using my main computer, with Windows 10 and two different GPUs: Radeon 5450 and a Nvdia GTX 1080.

For 240p gaming I'm using the Radeon, and since I'm using two different displays I need to make my CRT the primary monitor when I want to use Retroarch.

I'm trying to learn more about MME4CRT before using it. Right now I'm just using native resolutions manually, but sometimes not exactly native.

When playing SNES games, for example, I prefer to use 296x240 (or 304x240) instead of 256x240 because I think SNES games looks nicer with square pixels. The native SNES resolution (256x240) looks too stretched for my taste. Same thing for GBA and others systems with a horizontal resolution lower than 320.

So, I need to pick resolutions manually because some are not exactly native. I guess MME4CRT would not help me with that, unfortunately. 

I'm still not sure how Dynamic would work, to be honest. If I'm playing, for example, a game with a native resolution of 384x224 - the calculator says the dynamic resolution will be 1152. Do I need to have to have a modeline of exactly 1152x240 installed on the video card drivers before using it?


For Snes you should really use 512x224@60 Snes should be 224p for NTSC and 240p for PAL. As a few games use this resolution. Bsnes uses 512 by default.

Yes, calculate the horzontal and use that. So, you should end up with 1152x224@60 or 50.

I am going to release a debug version soon. T will give you the actual resolutions being requested.


Quote:For 240p gaming I'm using the Radeon, and since I'm using two different displays I need to make my CRT the primary monitor when I want to use Retroarch.
This is being worked on. So, eventually you will not need to set the monitor to primary.
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#5
(02-18-2019, 08:37 AM)alphanu Wrote: For Snes you should really use 512x224@60 Snes should be 224p for NTSC and 240p for PAL. As a few games use this resolution. Bsnes uses 512 by default.

Yes, calculate the horzontal and use that. So, you should end up with 1152x224@60 or 50.

I am going to release a debug version soon. T will give you the actual resolutions being requested.

I understand that 512x224 would give me the most accurate resolution, but I prefer to use a higher horizontal resolution because I don't like how SNES games originally looks (a bit stretched). 

Isn't it possible to make MME4CRT pick a higher horizontal resolution if the intended resolution is not found? For example, SNES games using 640x224 instead of 512x224 if 512x224 is not installed. But still only multiplying the horizontal resolution by two, then leaving black bars. 

By the way, using the dynamic calculator shows a 1024 width for a original 256 width (multiplying by four). But you can use 2560 instead and multiply the original 256 by 10. Both should look the same. So, what difference does dynamic make?
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#6
Quote:By the way, using the dynamic calculator shows a 1024 width for a original 256 width (multiplying by four). But you can use 2560 instead and multiply the original 256 by 10. Both should look the same. So, what difference does dynamic make?

DYNAMIC will switch on the horizontal resolution. Many consoles did this on the original hardware. SNES, PSX, SATURN, GENISIS, N64 and so on all do this mid game. Even some arcade hardware did this. When your using a static super resolution the width is locked at that resolution, it does not change. This means that you are not getting the true video output. The video will be the wrong aspect, wrong boarders, wrong scale and if its not an exact multiple you'll get artefacts. 

The lower the super resolution is, the closer you get to real looking hardware. It is mainly designed to give the look and feel of native resolution swiyching but for hardware that can not handle it. Like Intel and NVIDIA.

I personally use NATIVE as I have a AIT GPU.

Here is a video showcasing it.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xn6DBimQmL8
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